Spring 2019

Christopher Collins

African American Resistance to Slavery in the Nineteenth Century Antebellum South

Christopher Collins

Monday, February 4, 2019 12 noon – 1 pm 
Emeritus Hall, Newman Auditorium
Santa Rosa Campus 
To join the Zoom webinar, click: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/356294367 (Webinar ID: 356 294 367)

The struggles of African American children, women, and men are often discussed in connection to nineteenth century enslavement.  However, the importance of resistance is key to understanding the struggle and power within the history and legacy of enslaved people. This presentation provides historical examples of power and resistance, honoring the voices of enslaved African Americans of the nineteenth century who resisted enslavement.

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Erik Castro

A Photographer’s Year with a Homeless Couple

Erik Castro

Monday, February 11, 2019 12 noon – 1 pm 
Emeritus Hall, Newman Auditorium
Santa Rosa Campus 
To join the Zoom webinar, click: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/356294367 (Webinar ID: 356 294 367)

Photojournalist Erik Castro spent 14 months photographing the daily lives of a homeless couple he met living under Highway 101 during the winter of 2017. The city had recently declaredHomeless couple huddled together a homeless emergency when Castro documented the couple through a tumultuous year that ended in a bitter breakup. He discusses what he witnessed and the stories behind many of the photos taken for this project. “It felt cruel to complain about suffering people living on those underpasses as being a nuisance, so I decided to create photography that shows what homelessness feels like from the person experiencing it.”
To read the story published in The Press Democrat online, BROKEN: A Year in The Life of Steve & Michelle, go to this link: www.srhomelessproject.com

There will be a reception the same day as the lecture at the Robert F. Agrella Gallery from 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.  His work will be on view at the gallery Monday, February 4  to Thursday, February 14, 2019 during regular gallery hours 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Monday – Thursday.

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Dr. Kim Hester Williams

‘Beta Days and Gamma People’: Afro-Eco-Poetics, New WorldMaking, and Womanist Speech Sounds in Octavia Butler’s Post-Apocalyptic Imagination

Dr. Kim Hester Williams

Monday, March 11, 2019 12 noon – 1 pm
Emeritus Hall, Newman Auditorium
Santa Rosa Campus
To join the Zoom webinar, click: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/356294367 (Webinar ID: 356 294 367)

Kim D. Hester Williams teaches nineteenth-century American literature, African American literature and culture, and U.S. Women and Gender/Feminist/Womanist literature. She also teaches in the Film Studies MA and undergraduate minor programs at Sonoma State University. Her current scholarship considers race, ecology, and Afro-eco-poetics with particular attention to the work of science fiction writer Octavia Butler.
Dr. Hester Williams is co-editor of a collection of interdisciplinary essays on race and environment, Racial Ecologies. The book collection also features her chapter, "Earthseeds of Change: Post-Apocalyptic Mythmaking, Race, and Ecology in The Book of Eli and Octavia Butler’s Womanist Parables." In addition to her scholarly work, Dr. Hester Williams writes poetry grounded in the long tradition of African American womanist poetics.

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Dr. Orlando E. Raola

The Dream of a Language Bridge: Esperanto in the World Today

Dr. Orlando E. Raola

Monday, April 1, 2019 12 noon – 1 pm
Emeritus Hall, Newman Auditorium
Santa Rosa Campus
To join the Zoom webinar, click: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/356294367 (Webinar ID: 356 294 367)

The need for language bridges has been a constant presence since the beginning of interacting with members of different tribes and of different nations. The solutions used for this communication problem have taken different forms through the centuries. Nowadays, some think thatLighted Bridgethe English language can rightfully claim to be the long-sought bridge. However, there are many reasons why this isn’t so, and more importantly, why it should not be so. In the search for a more efficient, just, and egalitarian bridge, the idea of a planned or constructed language has been around for the longest time. Of the myriad of projects proposed, only one has achieved all the evolutionary steps to become a fully functional and living language: the International Language Esperanto. In this lecture, the highlights of 130 years of Esperanto development are presented together with a perspective of the new possibilities opened by the omnipresent World Wide Web and with some serious reflection about the future of human communication.

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Ian Sanborn

Poetry in Signing

Ian Sanborn

Monday, April 15, 2019 12 noon – 1 pm
Emeritus Hall, Newman Auditorium
Santa Rosa Campus
To join the Zoom webinar, click: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/356294367 (Webinar ID: 356 294 367)

Ian Sanborn, a well-known storyteller, uses signing to express language and develops creative videos expressing movements and ideas. He creates storytelling videos to help deaf and hearing children develop their signing skills.
Ian is a graduate of the National Theatre of the Deaf and has presented at the Deaf West Theatre Workshop, directed the Little Theatre of the Deaf Productions “Beware of the Brindlebeast” and “Ladybug.” He studied counseling psychology at Johnson and Wales University. 

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Dolores Huerta

In Conversation with Civil Rights Activist Dolores Huerta       

Dolores Huerta

Monday, April 22, 2019 12 noon – 1 pm
Emeritus Hall, Newman Auditorium
Santa Rosa Campus
To join the Zoom webinar, click: https://cccconfer.zoom.us/j/356294367 (Webinar ID: 356 294 367)

Dolores Huerta is a civil rights activist and community organizer. She has worked for labor rights and social justice for over 50 years. In 1962, she and Cesar Chavez founded the United Farm Workers union.  She served as Vice President and played a critical role in many of the union’s accomplishments for four decades. In 2002, she received the Puffin/Nation $100,000 prize for Creative Citizenship, which she used to establish the Dolores Huerta Foundation of which she is founder and president. The Foundation is connecting groundbreaking community-based to state and national movements to register and educate voters; advocate for education reform; bring about infrastructure improvements in low-income communities; advocate for greater equality for the LGBT community; and create strong leadership development. She has received numerous awards: among them, The Eleanor Roosevelt Humans Rights Award from President Clinton in 1998. In 2012, President Obama bestowed Dolores with The Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor in the United States.
Sponsored by the Dede and David Del Monte Lectureship Endowment

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